50 Fun Science Experiments Kids Can Do at Home

Learning isn’t just reserved for the classroom. Take the lesson home with these exciting, easy science experiments your kids will love.

Kick It in the Kitchen

Clear off your counter tops and get out the beakers. Your kitchen can be used for more than just cooking. Using ingredients you’ve got on hand, take a look at these science experiments you can do in your kitchen.

1. Baking Soda Volcano

Watch your kids wonder at the chemical reaction of a baking soda and vinegar volcano. Put some of the baking soda into your container, add some vinegar, and get ready for an eruption!

Supplies:

  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • A Container as the Volcano

2. Wizard’s Brew

Join potions class at Hogwarts with this experiment. Fill your glass jar halfway full with vinegar. Add in a few drops of food coloring and a few pinches of glitter. Stir in some dish soap and set your jar on a tray. Add in a teaspoon of baking soda, give it a stir, and watch your potion start to brew! As the bubbling continues, add in more baking soda and vinegar with a different food coloring to create a rainbow.

 

Supplies:

  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Food Coloring
  • Dish soap
  • A Glass Jar
  • A Tray
  • Glitter
  • Wizard’s Hat (Optional)

3. Invisible Ink

Write up a secret message with invisible ink. Stir together lemon juice and a few drops of water in a small bowl. Dip a q tip or cotton ball into the mixture and write your message on a white piece of paper. Once the juice has dried, your message is safe! To unveil your secret, heat up the page with a hairdryer or by holding the paper close to a lightbulb.

Supplies:

  • Lemon Juice
  • Water
  • Small dish
  • Paper
  • Cotton ball/Q Tip
  • Lightbulb or Hairdryer
  • A Secret to Hide

4. Tie-Dyed Milk

Watch a mesmerizing negative reaction with milk and dish soap. Pour a layer of milk into a shallow pan. Place a drop of different colored food coloring in each corner of the milk. Add a drop of dish soap right in the middle and watch a swirl of reaction. Once the colors have moved, grab a toothpick and play with the design.

Supplies:

  • Milk
  • Shallow Dish
  • 4 Different Food Coloring
  • Dish Soap
  • Toothpick

5. Bottle Tornado

Ever wish you could control the weather? Create your very own tornado in a bottle to live out your dream! Fill a clear water bottle almost to the top with water. Place an empty cup on the counter. Raise the bottle directly above the empty cup. Quickly flip the bottle upside down, letting the water pour out. Immediately begin shaking the bottle in a clockwise direction. Watch as your cyclone forms!

Supplies:

  • Clear Water Bottle
  • Empty Cup
  • Water
  • Lava Lamp: Create a groovy lava lamp in just a few easy steps. Fill an empty glass about ¾ way full of water. Add in a few drops of your favorite color food coloring. Pour ¼ cup of vegetable oil on top of the water.  Sprinkle the salt and watch lava wiggle around your glass.

Supplies:

  • Water
  • Clear Glass
  • Vegetable Oil
  • Food Coloring
  • Salt

6. Submarine Soda Can

  • It might not have a periscope, but watch as an ordinary soda can becomes a voyaging submarine. Empty a soda can and insert the end of the clear tube into the can. Fill the can completely to the top with water. Drop the can into your tall vase of water and watch the sink into the depths. Blow into the tube, adding air, and watch the submarine rise back to the surface.

Supplies:

  • Empty Soda Can
  • Tall, Clear Vase or Glass
  • Clear Plastic Tub
  • Water

7. Get Slimed

Use this easy recipe to watch cornstarch solidify liquid into slime. In a bowl add 1 cup of water and 1.5 cups of cornstarch. Add in a few drops of food coloring and stir until the mixture becomes slimy. Add more cornstarch to make the slime less liquidy.

Supplies:

  • Water
  • Cornstarch
  • Food Coloring
  • Catch a Cloud in a Bottle: Fire up that weathervane again, but this time, make your own cloud. To a 1-liter bottle, add just enough warm water to cover the bottom. Light a match and drop it into the bottle. When the bottle has filled with smoke, screw the cap onto the bottle. Give the bottle a few good squeezes and let you own cloud form.

Supplies:

  • Warm Water
  • Match
  • 1-Liter Bottle
  • Tickled Tastebuds: Sometimes you can’t get a taste from your mouth, but other times you can’t taste things at all! Learn how taste works together with your nose and eyes. Grab an array of foods you know the flavors to well. Hold your nose and close your eyes while someone feeds you each food item. See if you can still guess what you’re eating without all your senses!

Supplies:

  • Food Items
  • Food Server
  • Blindfold (Optional For Cheaters)
  • Candy Rock Formation: Some rock you can eat! Create your own rock candy that sparkles and shines. Mix equal parts sugar and water in a pot over the stove. Heat the water until all the sugar has dissolved. Begin adding small amounts of sugar until the sugar will no longer dissolve. Add candy flavor is preferred. Allow water to come to a simmer before removing the sugar water from heat and letting it cool.  Pour the cooled sugar water into a few clear glass jars and add desired food coloring to each jar. Cut wooden skewers to a length that will fit in the jars. Dip one end of the skewer into water and then roll it in sugar. Allow them to dry. Clip the non-sugared end of the skewer in a clothespin. Balance the clothespin across the opening of the glass jars, so the sugared end is suspended in the colored sugar water. Come back each day for about a week and watch the rock candy grow!

Supplies:

  • Sugar
  • Water
  • Food Color
  • Glass Jars
  • Clothespins
  • Orange Buoyancy: Learn about what changes buoyancy with oranges! Find 2 oranges and peel one of them, leaving the peel on one. Fill a tall vase or large glass with water. Drop in the peeling orange first and see if it floats or sinks. Next, drop in the unpeeled orange in. Notices the differences a peel can make!

Supplies:

  • Tall Vase or Large Glass
  • Water
  • 2 Oranges
  • Swimming Spaghetti: Watch your favorite pasta learn to swim! Pour 1 cup of water and 2 teaspoons of baking soda into a clear glass. Break spaghetti noodles into smaller parts, dropping about 6 into the cup. The noodles will sink to the bottom. Add in 5 teaspoons of vinegar and watch the noodles take off in the glass!

Supplies:

  • Water
  • Clear Glass
  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Spaghetti Noodles
  • Ice Breaker: Learn what happens to water when it becomes ice. Fill two plastic cups as full as possible with water. Add a top to one of the cups. Place both cups in the freezer overnight and see what happened in the morning!

Supplies:

  • Plastic Cups
  • Water
  • Freezer
  • 1 Top
  • Paper Clip Push Over: Paper clips seem so small, but they can have an impact! See the addition of matter with this water level experiment. Fill a cup all the way to the top with water. Begin gently dropping in paper clips until they cause the water to overflow. Take a guess how many it will take beforehand!

Supplies:

  • Glass or Cup
  • Paper clips
  • Water

Backyard Bash

The best science experiments cannot be contained to a room. Head outside to take your science lesson to the next level.

  • Hot Air Balloon: Hot air rises! Prove it by making a huge balloon. Open up a large trash bag and let a summer breeze fill it with air. Quickly tie the bag shut to trap the air inside. Release and watch the hot air rise.

Supplies:

  • Large Trash Bag
  • Summer Breeze
  • Bubble Worms: Blowing bubbles is always fun, but what how a sock can transform your bubble into worms! Take a water bottle and cut off the bottom. Place a sock over the open end you just removed and secure it with a rubber band. Pour bubble soap into a dish and dip the sock into the dish. Blow on the rim of the bottle and see as your bubbles turn to worms.

Supplies:

  • 500 mL Water Bottle
  • Sock
  • Rubber Band
  • Bubble Soap
  • Baking Soda Boat: Create a self powered steamboat with a water bottle and some baking soda. Cut a hole in the bottom of a water bottle and insert a straw into the hole. Add some hot glue around the hole to secure the opening and keep the straw in place. Pour in 1 cup of vinegar and a few spoonfuls of baking soda into the bottle. Quickly release the boat into a kiddie pool of water with the straw up and watch your boat sail!

Supplies:

  • Kiddie Pool with Water
  • Water Bottle
  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Plastic Straw
  • Hot Glue
  • Soda Fountain: While adults love chocolate fountains, kids prefer fountains of soda. Grab a 2-liter bottle of diet soda. Position the bottle in the ground on a flat, open surface. Make sure you are clear of anything you don’t want getting a sugary shower. Roll up a piece of paper to create a tunnel. Grab your mentos and slide them all down the tunnel into the bottle at the same time. Get clear as your fountain erupts!

Supplies:

  • 2-Liter Bottle of Diet Soda
  • 7 mentos
  • Rolled Paper
  • Wide Open Space
  • Egg Red Carpet: Jesus walked on water, kids can walk on eggs! Head outside with 2 cartons of eggs. Spread out a tarp or trash bag and set the cartons of eggs in the middle in two rows beside each other. Make sure none of the eggs are broken or cracked ahead of time. Take off any socks or shoes. Using a helping hand for balance, step carefully onto one carton of eggs, keeping your foot as flat as possible. Once you’ve have you weight evenly distributed, shift all your weight to the foot on the eggs. Move your other foot onto the other carton. Feel how your weight being shared between all the eggs keeps them from breaking!

Supplies:

  • 2 Cartons of Eggs
  • Tarp or Trash Bag
  • A Balance Helper
  • Green Pennies: Switch your green thumb for a green penny with this outdoor chemical reaction. Place a dish outside and cover the inside with a paper towel. Place your pennies on the paper towel. Begin pouring vinegar over pennies until the paper towel in soaked through. Watch over the next few days as your pennis begin to change before your eyes.

Supplies:

  • Pennies
  • Vinegar
  • Paper Towel
  • Dish
  • Time to wait while the reaction takes place
  • Surface Tension Coins: Learn how surface tension can keep water sticking in a bubble. Place a few different coins on a paper towel. Fill a dropper with water and begin placing one drop at a time on the surface of each coin. Watch at the water holds together to create a growing bubble of surface tension!

Supplies:

  • Coins
  • Paper Towel
  • Water
  • Dropper
  • Watercolor Flowers: Make a rainbow in your garden! Start with 3 white colors flowers. Cut the ends of the stems so they have a fresh cut. Fill 3 glasses half full with water and place a few drops of different colored food coloring in each. Place one flower in each glass and wait for the petals to shine bright with color.

Supplies:

  • 3 White Flowers
  • 3 Water Glasses
  • 3 Colors of Food Coloring
  • Water
  • Scissors
  • Mini Microscope: Exploring the great outdoors can be exciting, so why not give yourself the ability to see its wonders a little more closely. Take a clear, plastic cup and make a small rectangular cut out on the bottom side. Place a piece of clear plastic wrap over the open top of the cup and wrap a rubber band around to secure it. Find a small specimen to examine and slide it through the cutout at the bottom. Place a few drops of water on the plastic wrap, making a little pool. Check out your magnified specimen through the water pool!

Supplies:

  • Clear Plastic Cup
  • Plastic Wrap
  • Rubber Band
  • Scissors
  • Water
  • Something cool to see closer
  • Sundial Watch: Bring back some historical technology by making your own sundial. Search your yard for the straightest stick you can find and 12 small rocks. Push the end of the stick into your yard so it is standing straight up. Arrange the rocks in a semicircle, making sure they are evenly spaced. Grab a watch and watch the shadow from you stick move like a watch hand.

Supplies:

  • Stick
  • 12 Rocks
  • Watch to Compare
  • Sunlight
  • Pop Rocks Balloons: Pop rocks crackle and spark in your mouth, but how much gas is really inside? Compare the gas production of Pop Rocks with the chemical reaction of vinegar and baking soda. Grab 2 balloons and fill one with Pop Rocks and one with Baking Soda. Set balloons aside. Pour some vinegar in one bottle and soda into the other. Attach the balloon with the baking soda to the top of the vinegar bottle and attach the Pop Rocks balloon to the top of the soda bottle. When you are ready, turn both balloons upside down, dropping the contents into the bottles. See which balloons blows up the fastest to track gas release!

Supplies:

  • 2 empty water bottles
  • 2 balloons
  • Pop Rocks
  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Soda
  • Milk Carton Periscope: Finish off the equipment for the submarine we made earlier by fashioning a periscope from a milk carton. Begin by cutting off the peaked end of the milk carton top. Cut a hole on the bottom front of the carton, leaving about ¼ inch on either side. Lay the carton down on its side, so the hole you cut is facing your right. On the side facing up, cut a diagonal slit starting about 2 3/4 inches up the left side and down connecting to the bottom right corner. Insert your mirror into the slit and tape to secure it. Repeat these steps with another milk carton. Stand one carton up with the hole facing you. Stand the other carton upside down the hole facing away. Place the upside down carton directly on top of the carton in front of you and secure with tape. Start exploring with your periscope!

Supplies:

  • 2 Empty Milk Cartons
  • Tape
  • 2 Small Mirrors
  • Scissors or Box Cutter
  • Ruler
  • Rainbow Light Refraction: Ever wonder how rainbows are created? See the effects of light refraction with this simple experiment. Grab a clear glass full of water and a piece of paper. Head outside on a sunny day. Hold the glass up to the sun and hold the paper behind it. Watch rainbows dance from the light!

Supplies:

  • Clear Glass
  • Water
  • Paper
  • Sunlight
  • Magical Flames: Want to see fire resistant paper? Cut a sheet of plain paper into strips. Grab a strainer from the kitchen and head onto a concrete surface outside. Place the strips of paper in the strainer and hold it as far away from you as possible. Hold a lighter underneath the strainer and watch as the paper refuses to burn!

Supplies:

  • Paper
  • Strainer
  • Lighter
  • Safety Gloves
  • Parental Supervision

Blast in the Bathroom

  • Elephant Toothpaste:  Ever wonder how elephant brush their teeth? They might not have giant toothbrushes, but we can make giant toothpaste!  Place an empty 1-liter soda bottle in the bathtub. Use a funnel to pour 4 ounces of 40-volume hydrogen peroxide into the bottle. Add a few drops of dish soap and food coloring to the bottle and give it a swirl to mix. Mix a bag of dry yeast with 4 tablespoons of warm water into a separate plastic cup. Pour the yeast mixture into the bottle and let the elephants now they’re new toothpaste is ready!
    Supplies:
  • Empty 1-Liter Bottle
  • 40-Volume Hydrogen peroxide
  • Dish Soap
  • Food Coloring
  • Dry yeast
  • Warm Water
  • Plastic Cup
  • Fishing for Ice: Full up your sink with water, adding in a good amount of ice cubes. Drop a string into the water and try to ‘catch’ some ice cubes. It’s pretty impossible! Now sprinkle the ice cubes with water and let the string sit in the water for a minute. Pull the string to see your catch of the day!

Supplies:

  • Water
  • Sink
  • Ice Cubes
  • Salt
  • String
  • Water Bender: Want to feel like a superhero that can bend water? Grab a comb from your bathroom and move to the sink. Turn on the water gently until you have only a thin stream coming out. Brush the plastic comb through your clean, cry hair 10 times. Carefully bring the comb close to the stream of water without touching it. Revel in your new super power as the water bends towards the comb!

Supplies:

  • Plastic Comb
  • Sink
  • Clean, Dry Hair
  • Shave Cup Squeeze: Want to see the fun the force of pressure can cause? Grab a few medium and large plastic cups. Set up the medium cups upside down in a row on the bathroom counter. With scissors or a sharp pen, poke three good size holes in the tops of the large cups. Squeeze a mound of foaming shave cream into the tops of the medium cups. Place the large cups over the shave cream and create pressure by squishing the cup down. Watch the cream explode!

Supplies:

  • Medium and Large Size Plastic Cups
  • Foaming Shave Cream
  • Scissors
  • Water Transformation: Water can do amazing things. Grabs some items from around the house that do not react or change in water (Plastic toy, cup, an apple, etc.). Now, grab some items to do react to water (Sponge, fabric, ice cube, etc). Watch how water changes some things but not others.

Supplies:

  • Bathtub
  • Non-Reacting Items
  • Reacting Items
  • Steam Powered Reaction: Notice how your bathroom mirror is always foggy after a hot shower? When liquid water gets too hot, it turns to steam gas. When that gas hits your cool mirror, it goes back to a liquid. Want to find out what can keep your mirror from steaming? Find a few different test items to apply to sections of your mirror (shaving cream, dish soap, the inside of a potato, shampoo, car wax, etc). Take a steamy shower and discover which items keep your mirror clear!

Supplies:

  • Mirror
  • Shower
  • Test Items
  • Toilet Paper Inersia: Newton’s 1st Law talks about how objects in motion stay in motion, while objects at rest stay at rest. Test this law with a toilet paper roll! Put a full roll on a roll holder. Give the end a good tug and watch the roll stay in motion until a force slows it down. Once it stops, watch as it stays at rest until you act on it again. Inersia!

Supplies:

  • Full Roll of Toilet Paper
  • Roll Holder
  • Water and Air Interact: Watch how air and water interact in this simple demonstration. When taking a bath, grab an empty water bottle. Just turn the empty bottle upside down and insert it down into the water. Watch as the bubble rise when air tries to rise! Try it again with a bottle that is half full.

Supplies:

  • Bathtub
  • Empty Water Bottle
  • Sound Waves in the Tub: See how soundwaves travel through different mediums. Grab two spoons from the kitchen and knock them together under the water. Observe how quiet the noise is under the water. Now dunk your head under and knock them together again. Hear how much louder the sound is when the waves don’t have to travel through different mediums!

Supplies:

  • Bathtub
  • Metal Spoons
  • Float and Sink: See how shape can affect buoyancy. Take a sheet of tin foil and lay it flat on the top of the water in the tub. The foil floats easily over the water! Now ball up the foil, changing its shape, and watch it sink to the bottom.

Supplies:

  • Sheet of Tin Foil
  • Bathtub

Garage Art Studio

Want to let your creative imagination free? Head on out to your garage and get ready to get messy.

  • Static Electricity: Create your own electricity with static! Simply take a balloon and blow it up. Tie the end to secure the air in the balloon. Rub the balloon back and forth across a carpet rug. Then, rub the balloon back and forth against your hair. Slowly raise the balloon off your hair and watch the magic happen!

Supplies:

  • Carpet
  • Balloon
  • Head of Hair
  • Create Primary/Secondary Colors: Learn how colors combine to create brand new hughes. Find a few shallow dishes and fill them with water. Take food coloring with all the primary colors of red, yellow, and blue. Put a few drops of each color in their own dish. Now add drops of another color to each and experiment to find how to create the secondary colors.

Supplies:

  • Food Color in Primary Colors
  • Shallow Dishes
  • Water
  • Rainbow Paper: Learn how oil refraction and water can make a rainbow inside! Fill a clear bowl with water and add one drop of clear nail polish to the water. Wait a few seconds for the polish and water to mix. Dip a black piece of paper into the water and marvel at the colorful outcome!

Supplies:

  • Clear Bowl
  • Water
  • Clear Nail Polish
  • Black Paper
  • Musical Kazoo: Explore sound and music by making your very own instrument. Cover one end of a paper towel or toilet paper roll with wax paper and secure with a rubber band. Use a sharp pencil to poke a hole in the side of the roll. Place your mouth over the open end of the roll and make a humming sound with your mouth to start making music! Change your voice higher or lower to see how the sound changes.

Supplies:

  • Paper Towel or Toilet Paper roll
  • Wax Paper
  • Rubber Band
  • Sharp Pencil
  • Climbing Colors: Watch color go on the move! Choose your favorite colored marker and draw a thick circle where the ruffle meets the center of a white coffee filter. Find a small, shallow glass and fill it a little over halfway with water.  Fold the coffee filter in half, then in half again, making a cone shape. Place the white tip into the glass where it barely touches the water. Watch as the water travels up the filter, chasing the color to the top!
    Supplies:
  • White Coffee Filters
  • Colored Markers
  • Small, Shallow Glass
  • Watercolor Ice: See how a solid can produce a liquid with watercolor ice painting! Pour some liquid watercolor paint or water with food coloring into an ice tray and let it freeze overnight. When morning comes, take out your watercolor ice and see how the solid can create liquid paint when it touches paper.

Supplies:

  • Watercolor paint or Water with Food Color
  • Ice Tray
  • Paper
  • Gravity Painting: Harness the power of gravity and use it to your artistic advantage. Find a pan with tall sides and cut a piece of paper to fit in the bottom of the pan. Dip a marble in washable paint and make sure it is coated. Drop the marble into the pan and shift, making gravity pull the marble across the paper in fun patterns.

Supplies:

  • Pans with Tall Edges
  • Washable Paint
  • Marbles
  • Paper
  • Magnetic Attraction Builder: The worst part of building with blocks is the time when they all come crashing down. Why not use magnets to create a force held tower? Use a hot glue gun to secure small magnets to the inside of empty tin cans. Use some positive magnets and come negative magnets. Have fun building and seeing which can stick together and which repel.

Supplies:

  • Magnets
  • Hot Glue
  • Tin Cans
  • Power of Vision: Unlock the power of perception with this vision trick. Cut two identical circles out of a piece of paper. Draw two coordinating pictures, one on each circle. (Ex: a fish on one and a fish bowl on the other) Tape a straw or stick to the back of one circle. Tape the other circle to the other side, sandwiching the straw or stick in between. Hold the straw or stick between your palms and spin to see the image collide!

Supplies:

  • Paper Circles
  • Stick or Straw
  • Markers or Crayons to Draw
  • Tape
  • Flying Balloon Birds: Create your own flying Angry Birds characters using balloons and air. Begin by decorating your balloon birds. Use sharpies to draw on a face and use tape to secure feathers to the sides of the balloon. Blow up the balloon and clamp the end with a clothespin. When you’re ready to fly, unclamp the clothespin and release.

Supplies:

  • Balloons
  • Sharpie
  • Feathers
  • Tap
  • Clothespins
  • Color Bombs: See color explode while seeing the transfer through density. Full a clear cup ¾ way full with water. Pour in enough vegetable oil to create a thin layer on top of the water. Drop in a few squirts of food coloring and watch as they make their way through the oil layer.  Once they reach the water, watch the colors explode!

Supplies:

  • Clear Glass
  • Food Color
  • Vegetable Oil
  • Water

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